Standard DateTime Format patterns:

Format pattern

Description

d

ShortDatePattern

D

LongDatePattern

f

Full date and time (long date and short time)

F

FullDateTimePattern (long date and long time)

g

General (short date and short time)

G

General (short date and long time)

m, M

MonthDayPattern

o, O

Round-trip date/time pattern; with this format pattern, the formatting or parsing operation always uses the invariant culture

r, R

RFC1123Pattern; with this format pattern, the formatting or parsing operation always uses the invariant culture

s

SortableDateTimePattern (based on ISO 8601) using local time; with this format pattern, the formatting or parsing operation always uses the invariant culture

t

ShortTimePattern

T

LongTimePattern

u

UniversalSortableDateTimePattern using the format for universal time display; with this format pattern, the formatting or parsing operation always uses the invariant culture

U

Full date and time (long date and long time) using universal time

y, Y

YearMonthPattern


Custom DateTime format patterns:

Format pattern

Description

d, %d

The day of the month. Single-digit days do not have a leading zero. The application specifies "%d" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

dd

The day of the month. Single-digit days have a leading zero.

ddd

The abbreviated name of the day of the week, (culture-specific string)

dddd

The full name of the day of the week, (culture-specific string)

f, %f

The fraction of a second in single-digit precision. The remaining digits are truncated. The application specifies "%f" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

ff

The fraction of a second in double-digit precision. The remaining digits are truncated.

fff

The fraction of a second in three-digit precision. The remaining digits are truncated.

ffff

The fraction of a second in four-digit precision. The remaining digits are truncated.

fffff

The fraction of a second in five-digit precision. The remaining digits are truncated.

ffffff

The fraction of a second in six-digit precision. The remaining digits are truncated.

fffffff

The fraction of a second in seven-digit precision. The remaining digits are truncated.

F, %F

Displays the most significant digit of the seconds fraction. Nothing is displayed if the digit is zero. The application specifies "%F" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

FF

Displays the two most significant digits of the seconds fraction. However, trailing zeros, or two zero digits, are not displayed.

FFF

Displays the three most significant digits of the seconds fraction. However, trailing zeros, or three zero digits, are not displayed.

FFFF

Displays the four most significant digits of the seconds fraction. However, trailing zeros, or four zero digits, are not displayed.

FFFFF

Displays the five most significant digits of the seconds fraction. However, trailing zeros, or five zero digits, are not displayed.

FFFFFF

Displays the six most significant digits of the seconds fraction. However, trailing zeros, or six zero digits, are not displayed.

FFFFFFF

Displays the seven most significant digits of the seconds fraction. However, trailing zeros, or seven zero digits, are not displayed.

gg

The period or era. This pattern is ignored if the date to be formatted does not have an associated period or era string.

h, %h

The hour in a 12-hour clock. Single-digit hours do not have a leading zero. The application specifies "%h" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

hh

The hour in a 12-hour clock. Single-digit hours have a leading zero.

H, %H

The hour in a 24-hour clock. Single-digit hours do not have a leading zero. The application specifies "%H" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

HH

The hour in a 24-hour clock. Single-digit hours have a leading zero.

K

Different values of the Kind property, that is, Local, Utc, or Unspecified.

m, %m

The minute. Single-digit minutes do not have a leading zero. The application specifies "%m" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

mm

The minute. Single-digit minutes have a leading zero.

M, %M

The numeric month. Single-digit months do not have a leading zero. The application specifies "%M" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

MM

The numeric month. Single-digit months have a leading zero.

MMM

The abbreviated name of the month

MMMM

The full name of the month

s, %s

The second. Single-digit seconds do not have a leading zero. The application specifies "%s" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

ss

The second. Single-digit seconds have a leading zero.

t, %t

The first character in the AM/PM designator, if any. The application specifies "%t" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

tt

The AM/PM designator ("ante meridiem" (before noon) or "post meridiem" (after noon)), if any. Your application should use this format pattern for languages for which it is necessary to maintain the distinction between AM and PM. An example is Japanese, for which the AM and PM designators differ in the second character instead of the first character.

y, %y

The year without the century. If the year without the century is less than 10, the year is displayed with no leading zero. The application specifies "%y" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

yy

The year without the century. If the year without the century is less than 10, the year is displayed with a leading zero.

yyy

The year in three digits. If the year is less than 100, the year is displayed with a leading zero.

yyyy

The year in four or five digits (depending on the calendar used), including the century. Pads with leading zeros to get four digits. Thai Buddhist and Korean calendars have five-digit years. Users selecting the "yyyy" pattern see all five digits without leading zeros for calendars that have five digits. Exception: the Japanese and Taiwan calendars always behave as if "yy" is selected.

yyyyy

The year in five digits. Pads with leading zeros to get five digits. Exception: the Japanese and Taiwan calendars always behave as if "yy" is selected.

yyyyyy

The year in six digits. Pads with leading zeros to get six digits. Exception: the Japanese and Taiwan calendars always behave as if "yy" is selected. The pattern can be continued with a longer string of "y"s padding with more leading zeros.

z, %z

The time zone offset ("+" or "-" followed by the hour only). Single-digit hours do not have a leading zero. For example, Pacific Standard Time is "-8". The application specifies "%z" if the format pattern is not combined with other format patterns.

zz

The time zone offset ("+" or "-" followed by the hour only). Single-digit hours have a leading zero. For example, Pacific Standard Time is "-08".

zzz

The full time zone offset ("+" or "-" followed by the hour and minutes). Single-digit hours and minutes have leading zeros. For example, Pacific Standard Time is "-08:00".

Default Separators

: The default time separator

/ The default date separator

Percent prefix

% c Where c is a format pattern if used alone. To use format pattern "d", "f", "F", "h", "m", "s", "t", "y", "z", "H", or "M" by itself, specify "%d", "%f", "%F", "%h", "%m", "%s", "%t", "%y", "%z", "%H", or "%M". The "%" character can be omitted if the format pattern is combined with literal characters or other format patterns.

Escape character

\c Where c is any character. Displays the character literally. To display the backslash character, use "\\".

ISO Standard dates

The function below can be used to return ISO date values.

Function DateToiso($Zeit) {
  "Returns an array containing the ISO Year, Week and DayofWeek"
  $DayofWeek = +$Zeit.DayofWeek
  if ($DayofWeek -eq 0) { $DayofWeek = 7 }           # Mon=1..Sun=7
  $Thursday = $Zeit.AddDays(4 - $DayofWeek)          # Go to nearest Thursday
  $Week = 1+[Math]::Floor(($Thursday.DayOfYear-1)/7) # Adjusted seventh
  $Year = $Thursday.Year         # Needed
  $Year, $Week, $DayofWeek
} # Source Dr J R Stockton

“I never accepted the idea that I had to be guided by some pattern or blueprint” ~ Little Richard

Related:

Q307938 - HOW TO: Change Date, Time, Number, and Currency Value Displays
IsoDates by Joel Bennett more verbose but equally accurate ISO dates.
Standard date and time notation - YYYY-MM-DD
Comparison operators -like, -lt, -gt, -eq, -ne, -match


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