ConvertTo-Csv

Convert .NET Framework objects into Comma-Separated Value (CSV) variable-length strings.

Syntax  
      ConvertTo-CSV [[-Delimiter] char]
         [-InputObject] psobject [-IncludeTypeInformation] [-NoTypeInformation]
            [-QuoteFields String[]] [-UseQuotes QuoteKind] [CommonParameters]

           
      ConvertTo-CSV [-UseCulture]
         [-InputObject] psobject [-IncludeTypeInformation] [-NoTypeInformation]
            [-QuoteFields String[]] [-UseQuotes QuoteKind] [CommonParameters]

key
   -Delimiter char
       The delimiter to separate property values. Default = comma (,).
       Enter a character, such as a colon (:). 

       To specify a semicolon (;), enclose it in quotation marks. Otherwise, it
       will be interpreted as the command delimiter.

   -InputObject psobject
       The object(s) to export as CSV strings. Enter a variable that contains the
       object(s) or type an expression that returns the object(s).

       When the -InputObject parameter is used to submit a collection of items,
       ConvertTo-Csv receives one object that represents the collection.
       Because one object cannot be converted, ConvertTo-Csv returns the entire collection unchanged.

       To convert multiple items, pipe them to ConvertTo-Csv.

       This parameter is an implementation detail: its purpose is to enable input via the pipeline, and its
       direct use with arrays (collections) does not (yet) provide any useful functionality.

   -IncludeTypeInformation
       When this parameter is used the first line of the output contains #TYPE followed by the
       fully qualified name of the object type. For example, #TYPE System.Diagnostics.Process.
       This parameter was introduced in PowerShell 6.0.

   -NoTypeInformation
       Remove the #TYPE information header from the output. 
       This parameter became the default in PowerShell 6.0 and is included for backwards compatibility.

   -QuoteFields
       Specifies the names of the columns that should be quoted.
       When this parameter is used only the specified columns are quoted. This parameter was added in PowerShell 7.0.

   -UseCulture
       Use the list separator for the current culture as the data delimiter. 
       Default = comma (,)

       This parameter is very useful in scripts that are being distributed to
       users worldwide. To find the list separator for a culture, use the following:
       (Get-Culture).TextInfo.ListSeparator.

   -UseQuotes
       Specifies when quotes are used in the CSV files.
       Possible values are:
          Never - don’t quote anything
          Always - quote everything (default behavior)
          AsNeeded - only quote fields that contain a delimiter character
       This parameter was added in PowerShell 7.0.

ConvertTo-CSV returns a series of comma-separated, variable-length (CSV) strings that represents the objects that you submit.
You can then use ConvertFrom-CSV to re-create objects from the CSV strings.

Export-CSV is the same as ConvertTo-CSV, except that it saves to a file.

Examples

Convert a date object to CSV format:

PS C:\> $date = get-date
PS C:\> convertto-csv -inputobject $date -delimiter ";" -notypeinformation

Convert a process object to CSV format:

PS C:\> get-process powershell | convertto-csv

Convert an event log object to CSV format:

PS C:\> get-eventlog -log "application" | convertto-csv -useculture

“Drunk with power isn’t the same as being drunk with booze” - Craig Ferguson

Related PowerShell Cmdlets:

Export-Csv - Export to Comma Separated Values (spreadsheet)


 
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